Myrtle – The Mercedes-Benz LA911

Every man is allowed a mid-life crisis car, aren’t they?  Usually these are red, have two doors and are made by one of the great marques.

Of course, the picture in your mind might not exactly match what we ended up getting, but when I took the family to Ournie to meet the red, two door, all wheel drive Mercedez-Benz, it was simply love at first sight.

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When we turned up to look at the big red truck, we met a real character in its owner, Michael.  Michael’s first question was almost impossible to answer.  “Whaddaya want to use it for?” he asked…

I didn’t really know what to say.  I mumbled something about using it for a horse truck.

“Nah.  Too slow for that.”

“Um…  I don’t really know.” I confessed.  Michael look at me curiously.  I think he thought I was just a little mad.  But nonetheless he let me take the take the family for a spin.  And we were hooked.  Slow it might be, but it was so much fun.

With the move coming up, I could see a real benefit in being able to load up all our farm equipment onto the truck – and so it didn’t take much for me to say yes.

And Myrtle?  The name came from a story dating back to its RFS days.  The truck was going flat out to a fire near Ournie, with a full load of water and a crew onboard.  One of the crew looked out the window and said over the roar of the engine “Oh look, we’ve been overtaken by a turtle”.

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This is one of the last LA911 trucks made in Stuttgart Germany.  It rolled off the production line in 1983, and was initially delivered to Telecom, before being transferred to the Ournie Rural Fire Service sometime there after.  It has traveled a mere 38,000km making it barely run in.  That said, the hills around Ournie are pretty steep, and given this truck gets along at around 70km on the flat, it would have plenty of hours on the clock.  These trucks have been known to put up with years of abuse and hard work, opening up large parts of Africa and South America where the term ‘roads’ is an euphemism.

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The engine is the venerable OM352, a 5.7 litre direct injection 6 cylinder diesel renowned for its longevity and simplicity.  The OM352 commenced production in 1964, and is found in trucks, tractors and boats the world over.  Later models were turbo-charged, however this one is naturally aspirated.

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I feared parts were going to be an issue, however Donaldson Motors in Melbourne has a full parts catalogue online – and most parts in stock.  The truck does need a new hand throttle fitted (as this also shuts the engine down), and a new one was delivered from Singapore within a week.  Impressive service indeed.

Nearly everyone who has seen the truck reckons it is fantastic, and loves it.  Except for one, who reckons I’m crazy.  But he’s a diesel mechanic.  What would he know?

So what are we going to use it for?  Well I do have a couple of ideas, but I reckon it would make a great camper.  With a coffee machine so I can sell coffee in remote areas and fund our travels.  In the mean time, it might haul firewood on the new not-so-rocky farm.  And i reckon it makes me look pretty cool too.  After all, isn’t that what a mid-life crisis car is supposed to do?

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The new ‘not-so-rocky farm’

After the whirlwind of the last three months, we are excited to be finally settling into our new home.  We have started unpacking boxes, the shed is slowly coming to order and we are starting to realise that Christmas is only a couple of days away.  It has taken a lot of ducks to line up in order to pull off the move, and more people than I could ever imagine to thank, but here we are.

The house was built in the mid 1980s – and is in original condition.  Whilst we have ideas about how to renovate it, we are making sure we live in it for 12 months first to get a full appreciation of how the house functions during the seasons.  I have joked that I am looking forward to 12 months off… but in reality it means I have a year to get the farm in order before my time will be taken up renovating!

In a former life, the property was used as a horse stud.  It has a collection of old stables, shelters, hay sheds and small paddocks.  In fact we have gone from three large paddocks at the Rock Farm to over 20 smaller paddocks.  This will work well for our plans of soil improvement through cell grazing, and I am really excited with this prospect, however there is lots of work to be done to tidy up the day paddocks and sheds.

The infrastructure is best described as ‘tired’.  Some of the solid fences will not take much work to bring into order, however there are kilometres of plain wire fences that need a lot of work.  The sheep are not contained by these fences, and I will have my work cut out ensuring our fences are stock proof.

But the property has grass.  Lots of grass.  And we will be looking for some cattle to help us manage the pasture.  I am really looking forward to experimenting with holistic pasture management through the use of livestock, and this property has real potential.  In the past, 20 acres or so has been sown to lucerne.  We may use this paddock to cut meadow hay, which we will use for our own stock / soil improvement projects.

The boy’s love the new fantasy land they have discovered.  The new place has a creek running along one boundary.  This will create lots of challenges with flood gates to repair and causeways to cross – but it also provides a beautiful cool haven to escape the hot days. The deciduous elm trees also do their part in creating a nutrient rich, moist soil, but I will have to manage their tendency to spread by suckers..

We had many ducks to line up with the purchase of this property.  Friends of ours bought the adjoining 200 acre block, and are looking forward to building a house on their block.  In the meantime their beautiful horses will spend time between both our properties… and I have no problem with that.

I think we will like living here 🙂

Rock Farm Sold

To say it has been a turbulent few months would be an understatement, but it is with mixed feelings that I can finally confirm that the Rock Farm is sold.

We have been honoured to be custodians of the Rock Farm for the past five years.  This beautiful property has taken us on a wonderful journey.  Whilst this blog has largely been about our trials and tribulations as we learn how to raise stock and rehabilitate our soil, there has been so much more to our time on the Rock Farm.

Less than three months ago, selling the Rock Farm was the last thing on our minds.  Our new lambs were growing into sheep, our soil was healing, our trees were growing and our boys were turning into young men.  We had built on the amazing legacy the previous owners had created and felt we were on the cusp of realising our own dreams for the property.

But you have to keep your mind open to new opportunities.  And when one knocked oh so softly, we knew it was worth investigating.  Once we decided it was worth going for, we gave it everything we had.

Getting the Rock Farm on the market was a huge challenge.  We decluttered the house and tidied up the sheds.  Then I disappeared to sea for a couple of weeks for work before coming home just in time for the first open home.  Jo had worked tirelessly in my absence and transformed our home into a magazine shoot.  Our agent, Chris Dixon did an excellent job and found a buyer for our home almost straight away.

I think we were all a little surprised how quickly we had found a new owner for the Rock Farm, but the realisation that we had a huge amount of work ahead of us soon set in.  Moving is an arduous task at the best of times, but in the lead up to Christmas, it has been particularly trying.

Looking back, we have been extremely fortunate to be custodians of our little patch of paradise for a brief moment in time.  Our gorgeous boys have thrived in the environment, learning all sorts of invaluable skills from raising livestock to repairing motorbikes and cars.

Not all the lessons have been easy.  Some have been physically demanding – learning to shear a sheep or mark lambs has challenged the lads.  Some have been emotionally draining, such as when a poddy lamb dies.  But these lessons have given the boys a good grounding in the cycle of life, and our part in it.

But they have loved it.  As have we.

So, where are we off to?

All will be revealed soon, but I can confirm that we have moved down the road, to another 40 hectare (100 acre) property…   The good news is that there will be so many more lessons to be shared on this blog as we start our new adventure on the new not-so-rocky Rock Farm!

But we will miss the original Rock Farm 🙂